Title

Pulmonary artery catheters : effects on patient outcome

Abstract

Pulmonary artery catheters (PAC) have been a topic of discussion in the critical care community of late. There have been studies that show benefits from the use of this catheter and some other studies show no benefits. Currently there are no standards in place for education, training, or for insertion guidelines of the PAC. Literature review regarding the PAC addressed the following research question: Does medical therapy, guided by the PAC, improve patient outcome? There is no agreement among the 15 studies reviewed. Five of nine studies that examined goal oriented therapy to supranormal hemodynamic values found a sub category of patients that had reduced mortality rates. This finding was limited to the patients that were able to reach the predetermined therapeutic goals regardless of randomization to a protocol or control group. Large, multi-center, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are underway by the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group and by the National Institutes of Health. These studies should help to better determine those groups of patients who may benefit from the use of the PAC. Nurses remain the primary individuals responsible for gathering, interpreting, and reporting data obtained with the PAC. By understanding the existing body of research nurses will have a solid foundation to assist physicians and patients in providing the best treatment options.

Notes

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Thesis Completion

1998

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Giovinco, Gina

Degree

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Degree Program

Nursing

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Health and Public Affairs;Health and Public Affairs -- Dissertations, Academic

Format

Print

Identifier

DP0021531

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

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