Abstract

In nature, microscopic surface textures impact useful function, such as the drag reduction of shark skin (Dean & Bhushan, 2010) and superhydrophobicity of the lotus leaf(Pan, Kota, Mabry, & Tuteja, 2013). In this study, we explore these phenomena by re-creating microscopic surface textures via the method of interfacial flow instability in drying polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) acetone solutions. In general, PVDF films can be made using either spin coating or electrospray deposition with various weight concentrations in acetone. In order to study the morphology of the porous structure of PVDF films, wet deposition samples were fabricated by spin coating or near-field electrospray. Possible theories are discussed and examined to explain the formation of these porous structures resulting in development of a well-controlled method to create porous PVDF films with various pore sizes and pore densities. All samples are characterized and found to exhibit superhydrophobicity and drag reduction. To connect porous PVDF film morphology to the established field of dry particle fabrication, PVDF particle synthesis by far-field electrospray is also reviewed and discussed. An established method to generate polymer particles of different morphologies in other polymers (Almeria-Diez, 2012) by electrospray drying is confirmed using PVDF as well. Due to the ability of scalable and re-configurable electrospray, the microscopic surface textures can be applied to areas of any size to reduce drag or impart water-repelling properties.

Notes

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Thesis Completion

2013

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Deng, Wei Wei

Degree

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Mechanical Engineering

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science; Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Format

PDF

Identifier

CFH0004479

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

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