Title

Spacecraft communication

Abstract

In many space projects, communication is the principal functional element [1]. Space communications systems are the electronic systems in spacecraft and their counterparts in ground stations (on Earth or on celestial bodies). These systems are required to transmit signals through space [2]. Space communications has played a vital role in the exploration and conquest of space. The need for space communication has evolved from expanding conventional systems for terrestrial communications and from the need to communicate with data-gathering spacecraft [3]. There are two important reasons for spacecraft communication. Space communication makes missions possible and is in the forefront of the development of any spacecraft. Without communication, space exploration would be useless. With the importance of communication in mind, I wanted to learn the elements of spacecraft communication from both the past and present. The three main questions that will be answered in the paper are: • How do we currently communicate with spacecraft? • What are the problems associated with communicating with spacecraft (i.e. delay, interference, and distance)? • How should the system compensate for the Doppler effect that will inevitably occur?

Notes

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Thesis Completion

2000

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Roberts, Tom L.

Degree

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

College

College of Business Administration

Degree Program

Management Information Systems

Subjects

Business Administration -- Dissertations, Academic;Dissertations, Academic -- Business Administration;Artificial satellites in telecommunication;Astronautics -- Communication systems

Format

Print

Identifier

DP0021553

Language

English

Access Status

Open Access

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Document Type

Honors in the Major Thesis

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