Bolivar Perez, 20'

Student

Bolivar Perez, 20'

Files

Cohort

2020

Biography

Bolivar Perez was born in Hialeah, Florida, and raised in Pembroke Pines, Florida. He is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering with a Minor in Math. He was first introduced to research his freshman year while participating in the NSF-funded L.E.A.R.N. Program, and has been involved in research since. Bolivar is currently participating in two research projects, involving seismic impact on ultra-high performance concrete column connections and adhesives to attach polymer composites on concrete surfaces, in the UCF Structures Laboratory under the mentorship of Dr. Kevin Mackie. Along with research experience, Bolivar also had the amazing opportunity to gain valuable structural engineering/construction industry experience in two internships, with Hub Steel and Optimus Structural Design. He is also very involved on campus as a Resident Assistant, Marshal for Chi Epsilon, and member of Tau Beta Pi. Upon graduation, Bolivar aspires to obtain a graduate degree in structural engineering, work in the structural design and construction industry for multiple years, and then return back to academia as a professor to inspire and guide the next generation of engineers.

Faculty Mentor

Kevin R. Mackie, Ph.D., P.E.

Undergraduate Major

Civil Engineering; Minor Mathematics

Future Plans

Ph.D. in Civil Engineering (Structural Engineering Specialization); M.B.A.

Research

Title: Impact of Building Vibrations on Vibrocardiographic Signal Collection

Institution: Conducted at the University of Central Florida, L.E.A.R.N. Program

Mentor: Hansen A. Mansy, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida.

Abstract: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the number one cause of death in the United States, killing approximately 614,348 people a year (“Leading Causes of Death,” 2016). VCG signals, vibrocardiographic signals, can provide useful clinical information which may lead to develop new diagnostic methods. However, due to the sensitive equipment used to collect accurate results, any amount of outside noise or vibrations will taint the data collected and provide inaccurate results. Thus, the building vibrations and those of the surrounding areas where the VCG signals are being collected can potentially impact the end results of the diagnosis. This study will investigate the effect of structural vibrations on VCG collection and determine whether they significantly alter the end result.

Leading Causes of Death. (2016, October 07). Retrieved January 20, 2017, from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm

Title: Substructure Connection in High Seismic Zones Utilizing Ultra-High Performance Concrete

Institution: Conducted at the University of Central Florida, Structures Laboratory

Principal Investigator: Titchenda Chan, M.S. Faculty Mentor: Kevin Mackie, Ph.D., P.E., Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida

Abstract: Precast modular solutions are being used increasingly over conventional cast-in place reinforced concrete for many bridge components. The precast components enable higher quality control, ensure faster bridge construction, and reduce traffic congestion. However, the connection studies for these components in moderate and high seismic regions are limited. Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) exhibits high compressive and tensile strength, long-term durability, and the self-consolidating properties make it a potential candidate for substructure connections. This project proposes a simple yet effective substructure connection for use in medium and high seismic regions utilizing UHPC.

Title: Polyurethane and Epoxy Primer Systems for Externally- Bonded FRP Composites in Retrofiting of Concrete Structures Conducted at the University of Central Florida, Structures Laboratory

Principal Investigator: Titchenda Chan, M.S. Faculty Mentor: Kevin Mackie, Ph.D., P.E., Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida

Abstract: Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have been increasingly used due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good resistance to corrosion in comparison to steel. Epoxy resins exhibiting high strength and low viscosity have been extensively researched and are the accepted standard for both CFRP matrix. However, the epoxy is costly and its volatiles may be harmful to human health and the environmental condition. Polyurethane (PU) systems whose composites are pre-impregnated are very promising alternatives to epoxy systems. In addition, there is evidence from previous studies that the properties that previously precluded PUs from being used result in better flexural behaviors than in epoxy-strengthened concrete systems. This research program aims to quantify the bond behavior of two PU adhesives used between PU-impregnated unidirectional CFRP and concrete surface in repairing and retrofitting of civil infrastructure applications relative to an epoxy-based primer.

Summer Research Institution

University of Michigan

Disciplines

Civil and Environmental Engineering | Civil Engineering | Engineering | Structural Engineering

Bolivar Perez, 20'

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