Event Title

These are the People in Your Neighborhood: Social Matters, Community Interviews, and the First Research Paper

Presentation Type

Workshop

Location

BHC 126

Start Date

26-9-2009 9:50 AM

End Date

26-9-2009 10:35 AM

Description/Abstract

This session presents a successful and highly flexible two-stage method of introducing first or second-year students to academic research, capitalizing on students’ natural interest in the lives of other people. Starting with a local interview, students produce a reflective draft that leads to a pertinent and realistic research question, a greater range of quality sources, and a short research paper with the marks of a motivated and socially-responsible writer. The writing and research stages will be demonstrated on slides, with particular emphasis on topic generation and source integration issues. Student work samples will be available to show how inexperienced writers have found a practical purpose for academic writing and begun to recog- nize themselves as voices in the community, people in the neighborhood. This presentation is for faculty in all academic areas as well as student engagement professionals. Participants will generate project frameworks appropriate to their own disciplines and leave the session with an idea sheet that can be implemented this semester and at no cost.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Sep 26th, 9:50 AM Sep 26th, 10:35 AM

These are the People in Your Neighborhood: Social Matters, Community Interviews, and the First Research Paper

BHC 126

This session presents a successful and highly flexible two-stage method of introducing first or second-year students to academic research, capitalizing on students’ natural interest in the lives of other people. Starting with a local interview, students produce a reflective draft that leads to a pertinent and realistic research question, a greater range of quality sources, and a short research paper with the marks of a motivated and socially-responsible writer. The writing and research stages will be demonstrated on slides, with particular emphasis on topic generation and source integration issues. Student work samples will be available to show how inexperienced writers have found a practical purpose for academic writing and begun to recog- nize themselves as voices in the community, people in the neighborhood. This presentation is for faculty in all academic areas as well as student engagement professionals. Participants will generate project frameworks appropriate to their own disciplines and leave the session with an idea sheet that can be implemented this semester and at no cost.