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2016
Friday, October 21st
11:00 AM

Registration

Florida Statewide Symposium

Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

1:00 PM

Welcome and Orientation

Kimberly Schneider, University of Central Florida
Emi Gonzalez-Luna, University of Central Florida

Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom. Breakout Room - Black

1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

1:30 PM

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

Trisha Thorme, Princeton University

Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom. Breakout Room - Black

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Transformative Learning Through Community-Based Research

By connecting undergraduate research to local issues, you can transform your students, your classrooms, and your community. Community-based research (CBR) combines both undergraduate research and service-learning and has been shown to be a high-impact practice. We’ll delve into the origins of CBR, comparing and contrasting its principles and practices with traditional forms of research and service-learning. Powerful examples from a variety of institutions will illustrate what is involved in a successful project and lead you to think about the possibilities at your own institution and community. In addition to showcasing particular projects, we will consider a variety of strategies for getting started in CBR.

Introduction: Alvin Wang, Dean, The Burnett Honors College

3:15 PM

SPECIAL PLENARY

Michael Aldonado-Jeffries, University of Central Florida
Natalia Toro, University of Central Florida

Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom. Breakout Room - Black

3:15 PM - 4:00 PM

Pipelining Diverse Undergraduate Researchers Into Graduate School

4:15 PM

INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS

Heather Edwards, Stetson University
Sherry Savrda, Seminole State College of Florida
Kimberly Reid, Florida State University
Adrienne Seitz, Florida State University

Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom. Breakout Rooms

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM

Cultivating Research Skills In Freshman And Sophomore Students at State Colleges
Breakout Room - Black
Heather Edwards (Stetson University) and Sherry Savrda (Seminole State College)

Recording Perspectives Abroad and At-Home: Giving Voice and the Process of Praxis
Breakout Room - Gold
Kimberly Reid and Adrienne Seitz (Florida State University)

Recording Perspectives Abroad and at Home: Giving Voice and the Process of Praxis

Adrienne Seitz, Florida State University
Kimberly Reid, Florida State University

Student Union, Pegasus Ballroom. Breakout Room - Gold

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM

Conducting community-based research while participating in international service learning seems like the perfect match. Executing research in a responsible and critical manner, however, can prove to be challenging. In this interactive presentation, we will demonstrate how FSU is tackling this challenge through its Global Scholars program. We will outline effective strategies used over the past 5 years, as well as new ones we are just beginning to implement. These new strategies hope to continue the process of reflecting, acting, and dialoguing, i.e. praxis, that students engaged in while overseas and apply it to conducting community-based research upon returning home.

5:15 PM

Abstracting Student Learning Through an Undergraduate Research Symposium

Wesley F. Lewis, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Catherine Wrobel, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Daytona Beach

Burnett Honors College

5:15 PM - 7:00 PM

In 2013, ERAU hosted its first campus-wide undergraduate research symposium. Since then, nearly 200 abstracts have been submitted and scored. Abstracts are scored using a rubric based on learning objectives related to six steps in the research process: defining a problem, designing a course of action, applying ethical principles, conducting research, reaching decisions based on evidence, and communicating results. Abstracts were analyzed to compare scores over each learning objective and by year. Based on analysis, intervention strategies have been developed to increase low-ranking learning objectives such as communication of results.

Best Practices of the University of Central Florida Undergraduate Research Journal: Publicizing and Supporting Student Writing

Alexandra Stepanov, University of Central Florida
Enrique Guerra-Pujol, University of Central Florida

5:15 PM - 7:00 PM

This project looks at the UCF Undergraduate Research Journal and explores the functioning of this small university level publication. This poster will review the strategies used by the journal to market themselves, support student writing, and overcome the challenges of being an interdisciplinary journal.

Poster Session and Reception

Florida Statewide Symposium

Burnett Honors College

5:15 PM - 7:00 PM

Promising Practices in Mentoring Minority Undergraduates in Research

Floralba Arbelo, Carlos Albizu University - Miami

Burnett Honors College

5:15 PM - 7:00 PM

Undergraduate research opportunities have been linked to outcomes produced from undergraduate student engagement in research activities are associated with gains in writing, cognitive, and personal skills, enhanced self-concept, and academic achievement (ASHE Higher Education Report, 2007; Estepp, Velasco, Culbertson, & Conner, 2016). Research experiences allow students to engage in deep learning, helping them learn to link ideas and identify patterns using evidence and logic by examining arguments; ultimately developing their own ideas about a particular problem through reflection (Entwistle, 2006). Research demonstrates that this high impact practice enhances a student’s link to the campus, faculty, and peers, which in turn supports their persistence (Kuh, 2008; Kuh 2013). Yet engaging minority undergraduate students in research activities has been a challenge in higher education. This literature review identified specific characteristics of research experiences that supported minority undergraduate students throughout different types of research activities. From the more traditional faculty led research mentorship to research activities that stemmed from curricular frameworks which were embedded across courses, there were clear behaviors, structures, and supports which created rich experiences for minority students. These were grouped into overarching themes that created meaning for minority students: relationships, self-efficacy, and structure of the research process.

The LEARN Consortium: A Three-institution Initiative to Impact STEM Retention of Freshmen and Transfer Students through Research Communities

Colleen Smith, University of Central Florida
Kim Schneider, University of Central Florida
Jodiene Johnson, Florida Atlantic University

Burnett Honors College

5:15 PM - 7:00 PM

With the national emphasis on promoting and increasing retention in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines, there is a need to establish retention models designed to be adaptable to varying types of students and institutions. Faculty at Florida Atlantic University (FAU), University of Central Florida (UCF), and Western Carolina University (WCU) have created the LEARN Consortium, a three-institution initiative to directly address this national need, by sharing and expanding best practices in existing retention models, and developing and testing new models for STEM retention, specifically targeting incoming transfer students. The STEM retention model being evaluated and modified is Learning Environment and Academic Research Network (L.E.A.R.N.TM). This model was developed at UCF targeting first-year students (FTIC) and has already demonstrated success in STEM retention for their students. We have modified this model to meet the unique needs of incoming upper-division AA transfer STEM students, while retaining the three central components of the model including Research, Mentoring, and Community building. We will implement both models (FTIC and Transfer) at all three different institutions beginning Fall 2016 and evaluate (1) the factors within a STEM research community which impact student success and retention, (2) the impact of the FTIC STEM model at improving STEM retention FAU and WCU and (3) the adaptability of a FTIC STEM model to an AA/AS transfer student population. We will present the two LEARN models outlining the modifications made to address the transfer student needs, share strategies for effective collaborations among the three institutions and summarize the assessment plans established for evaluating the effectiveness of this model at impacting STEM retention and success.

7:00 PM

Dinner On Your Own

Florida Statewide Symposium

7:00 PM

Saturday, October 22nd
8:15 AM

Coffee and Conversation

Florida Statewide Symposium

Burnett Honors College Lounge

8:15 AM - 9:00 AM

Florida Undergraduate Research Conference (FURC) - Open Planning Meeting

Florida Statewide Symposium

BHC 129

8:15 AM - 8:50 AM

9:00 AM

SPECIAL WORKSHOP

Trisha Thorme, Princeton University

BHC 130

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Community-Based Research: A Hands-On Workshop

10:10 AM

INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS

Michael Savarese, Florida Gulf Coast University
Ashley Spring, Eastern Florida State College
Scott Herber, Eastern Florida State College

BHC 126 and BHC 128

10:10 AM - 10:55 AM

Making Scholarly Activity Available to the Masses: The Scaffolding of Scholarship Throughout the Undergraduate Curriculum
BHC 126
Michael Savarese (Florida Gulf Coast University)

Q&A Panel: Common Concerns About Undergraduate Research at State Colleges
BHC 128
Ashley Spring and Scott Herber (Eastern Florida State College)

Making Scholarly Activity Available to the Masses: The Scaffolding of Scholarship Throughout the Undergraduate Curriculum

Michael Savarese, Florida Gulf Coast University
Trent R. Brown, Florida Gulf Coast University
Carolyn Culbertson, Florida Gulf Coast University
Anna Carlin, Florida Gulf Coast University

BHC 126

10:10 AM - 10:55 AM

Florida Gulf Coast University’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) focuses on improving student critical thinking, information literacy, and written communication. Rather than developing these skills through traditional methods (e.g., through senior-level, independent research), these learning outcomes are practiced through scholarly experiences. Traditional undergraduate scholarship manifests itself through terminal, senior capstone or research experiences. These, because of the economy of scale, typically reach a minority of students, often just honors students or those approached by faculty mentors. At FGCU, however, scholarly experiences are a part of the curriculum throughout the program of study, and scaffolded to build greater depth and sophistication. Presented here are examples from both a program in STEM (Marine Science) and the humanities (Music Performance).

Students in Marine Science receive their first exposure to the vetting of literature and expository scientific writing within their general education science courses. Students are presented with an exercise to evaluate the credibility of web-based literature using the CRAAP test. A semester-long writing assignment has them investigate an earth-process-related problem that has societal consequences. They review and evaluate the secondary literature, prepare a first draft that is critiqued, and then submit a final version while meeting a number of milestones along the way. Students enter the major’s curriculum through a course entitled “Scientific Process”, which introduces them to all aspects of scientific research and culminates with them writing and defending a research proposal they may eventually work to completion. Numerous courses at the upper-class level are designed as scholarly focused or enriched, a branding requiring that certain criteria are met. In these courses, students often participate in genuine collaborative research projects that can lead to student publication and enhance faculty productivity. Finally, as a senior, the capstone course requires that they produce a scholarly poster or oral presentation that is either given in the class or within a university forum.

Music Performance students’ experiences track towards demonstration of content mastery in the artifact of a senior recital. In this public display of scholarly achievement a student presents repertoire from major historical eras on his or her instrument or voice for an hour or more. Additionally the students complete a comprehensive document analyzing music in terms of performance practice (how and why certain music should be performed to meet historically appropriate creations and recreations). Students enter this major their freshman year after an audition process and immediately begin developing the skills required to demonstrate proficiency as professional musicians. Experiences performing in ensembles and in private lessons cultivate listening skills to make informed musical judgments. Theory courses develop students’ abilities to hear music with their eyes. Upper level courses require students to clearly articulate in writing their thoughts about music’s formal properties, why certain music requires particular performance considerations, and how to execute those performance requirements in their technique. The conundrum for collection of data is how to assess university-wide learning outcomes in the context of a performance. Without a tangible artifact, FGCU relies on artist teams to develop assessment procedures that accurately capture if students meet targets as demonstrated in performance.

Though too early for us to have extensive assessment data, anecdotal evidence suggests students enjoy this approach and are honing their skills within these learning outcomes. We anticipate these improvements will increase graduates’ life-long learning potential, as well as their competitiveness for employment and further education.

11:05 AM

INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS

Allen Smith, Florida Atlantic University
Julie Yazici, Florida Gulf Coast University

BHC 126 and BHC 128

11:05 AM - 11:50 AM

Integrating Undergraduate Research Projects in Learning Communities
BHC 126
Allen Smith (Florida Atlantic University)

Mentoring Undergraduate Research in Education and Business: Transformation in Global and Local Communities
BHC 128
Julie Yazici (Florida Gulf Coast University)

Mentoring Undergraduate Research in Education and Business: Transformation in Global and Local Communities

Hulya Julie Yazici
Tunde Szecsi, Florida Gulf Coast University

BHC 128

11:05 AM - 11:50 AM

The purpose of this presentation is to highlight avenues toward undergraduate scholarship in education and business. The common theme of these initiatives is the transformative learning which students experienced in local and global communities. In education, the examples include a course-embedded action research with community service, and autoethnography in which students analyzed their experiences abroad to uncover the process of transformation. In business, students worked on a semester long project in quality management collaborating with a local health equipment manufacturer. The systematic guidance of the business and continuous feedback of the instruction, resulted in full transformation of student learning.

12:00 PM

INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS

Aubrey A. Kuperman, University of Central Florida
Grayson Lanza, University of Central Florida
Valerie Kessler, University of Central Florida
Tom Vogel, Stetson University
Will Miles, Stetson University

BHC 126 and BHC 128

12:00 PM - 12:45 PM

Student Leadership: How to Leverage Peer-to-Peer Outreach on Campus
BHC 126
Aubrey Kuperman, Grayson Lanza, and Valerie Kessler (University of Central Florida)

The Stetson Undergraduate Research Experience: Over 25 Years of Undergraduate Research in Mathematics and Computer Science
BHC 128
Tom Vogel and Will Miles (Stetson University)

Student Leadership: How to Leverage Peer-to-Peer Outreach on Campus

Aubrey A. Kuperman, University of Central Florida
Valerie Kessler, University of Central Florida

BHC 126

12:00 PM - 12:45 PM

The Office of Undergraduate Research has three separate opportunities for current undergraduate researchers to assume a leadership role and assist their peers in getting started in research. This presentation will lay out three models for student leadership in undergraduate research: peer mentors/student teaching assistants in a three-day introduction to research course, student assistants who host peer mentor advising hours throughout the academic year, and a Student Council who focus on outreach across campus and advisory capacity. This session will provide an overview of these programs, and students will share their experiences as mentors in the programs.

12:45 PM

LUNCH

Florida Statewide Symposium

12:45 PM - 1:25 PM

1:30 PM

INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS

Allen Varela, Florida International University
Jorge Torres, Florida International University
LouAnne Hawkins, Leone & Hawkins Consultants
Christopher Leone, University of North Florida

BHC 126 and BHC 128

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM

Student Opportunities at Florida International University: A Snapshot
BHC 126
Allen Varela and Jorge Torres (Florida International University)

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Teaching Undergraduates Best Practices in Conference Presentations
BHC 128
LouAnne Hawkins (Leone & Hawkins Consultants) and Christopher Leone (University of North Florida)

Student Opportunities at Florida International University: A Snapshot

Allen Varela, Florida International University
Jorge Torres, Florida International University

BHC 126

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM

The Honors College (HC) was asked by the FIU Provost to take the lead in creating an innovative culture for undergraduate research at FIU. Our presentation is about how two of the elements of HC’s successful research program have been expanded university-wide: our Conference for Undergraduate Research (CURFIU) and our research opportunity database, the FIU Undergraduate Research Portal. The creation of this database provides an interactive site with information about research opportunities, conferences, scholarships, and a subscription system for students. We also discuss the challenges we face as we try to promote undergraduate research in an environment of limited resources.

2:25 PM

INTERACTIVE PRESENTATIONS

Kimberly Schneider, University of Central Florida
Tracy Baker, Florida Atlantic University
Latika Young, Florida State University

BHC 130

2:25 PM - 3:20 PM

The Undergraduate Research Count: Exploring Different Approaches to Assess Student Involvement and Engagement
BHC 130
Kimberly Schneider (University of Central Florida), Tracy Baker (Florida Atlantic University), Latika Young (Florida State University)

The Undergraduate Research Count: Different Approaches to Document Student Involvement and Engagement

Kimberly R. Schneider, University of Central Florida
Latika Young, Florida State University
Tracy Baker, Florida Atlantic University

BHC 130

2:25 PM - 3:20 PM

Determining how many students are involved in undergraduate research is challenging. Universities have used a variety of metrics to quantify participation including surveys, course enrollment data or program counts, self-reporting of students and/faculty, and campus-wide databases. This panel will discuss each type of “counting” system and evaluate the merits and potential costs of each.

3:20 PM

Debriefing

Florida Statewide Symposium

BHC 130

3:20 PM - 4:00 PM