Presentation Type

Poster Session

Location

Burnett Honors College

Start Date

21-10-2016 5:15 PM

End Date

21-10-2016 7:00 PM

Description/Abstract

Undergraduate research opportunities have been linked to outcomes produced from undergraduate student engagement in research activities are associated with gains in writing, cognitive, and personal skills, enhanced self-concept, and academic achievement (ASHE Higher Education Report, 2007; Estepp, Velasco, Culbertson, & Conner, 2016). Research experiences allow students to engage in deep learning, helping them learn to link ideas and identify patterns using evidence and logic by examining arguments; ultimately developing their own ideas about a particular problem through reflection (Entwistle, 2006). Research demonstrates that this high impact practice enhances a student’s link to the campus, faculty, and peers, which in turn supports their persistence (Kuh, 2008; Kuh 2013). Yet engaging minority undergraduate students in research activities has been a challenge in higher education. This literature review identified specific characteristics of research experiences that supported minority undergraduate students throughout different types of research activities. From the more traditional faculty led research mentorship to research activities that stemmed from curricular frameworks which were embedded across courses, there were clear behaviors, structures, and supports which created rich experiences for minority students. These were grouped into overarching themes that created meaning for minority students: relationships, self-efficacy, and structure of the research process.

 
Oct 21st, 5:15 PM Oct 21st, 7:00 PM

Promising Practices in Mentoring Minority Undergraduates in Research

Burnett Honors College

Undergraduate research opportunities have been linked to outcomes produced from undergraduate student engagement in research activities are associated with gains in writing, cognitive, and personal skills, enhanced self-concept, and academic achievement (ASHE Higher Education Report, 2007; Estepp, Velasco, Culbertson, & Conner, 2016). Research experiences allow students to engage in deep learning, helping them learn to link ideas and identify patterns using evidence and logic by examining arguments; ultimately developing their own ideas about a particular problem through reflection (Entwistle, 2006). Research demonstrates that this high impact practice enhances a student’s link to the campus, faculty, and peers, which in turn supports their persistence (Kuh, 2008; Kuh 2013). Yet engaging minority undergraduate students in research activities has been a challenge in higher education. This literature review identified specific characteristics of research experiences that supported minority undergraduate students throughout different types of research activities. From the more traditional faculty led research mentorship to research activities that stemmed from curricular frameworks which were embedded across courses, there were clear behaviors, structures, and supports which created rich experiences for minority students. These were grouped into overarching themes that created meaning for minority students: relationships, self-efficacy, and structure of the research process.