Keywords

Air quality, Road design and construction

Abstract

National ambient air quality standards for particulate matter have been promulgated since April, 1971. While effects of stationary sources on these standards have been examined, little research has been accomplished on the effects of fugitive particulate. This thesis examines the environmental impact of a fugitive dust source, Highway Construction. Using the High-Volume reference method for particulate sampling, the effect of Highway construction was determined. An analysis of concentrations, distance influences, meteorological influences, particle sizes and construction influences is presented. The data obtained from this study indicates the major influence of concentrations is a function of distance and sampling height. Particle sizes were observed to be larger than normal "urban" particles. While many air quality violations were noted, recommendations to reduce these occurrences are made.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1974

Advisor

Wanielista, Martin P.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Environmental Systems Management

Format

PDF

Pages

ix, 137 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0012669

Subjects

Air quality, Roads -- Design and construction

Contributor (Linked data)

Wanielista, Martin P. [VIAF]

Wanielista, Martin P. [LC]

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

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