Keywords

Computer network protocols, Wireless communication systems

Abstract

Hierarchical channel allocation schemes for cellular networks offer a promising approach to solve the pressing problem of increasing the cellular servicing capacity in spite of the limited radio spectrum available. We propose a hierarchical channel selection scheme for handling handoffs and new calls in micro/macro cellular systems. The scheme is intended to improve the performance and quality of service of these systems by increasing the cell channel utilization, reducing the handoff blocking probability and improving the responsive to new calls.

The proposed scheme is based on several design enhancements including an overflow buffer, which is used for handoff calls that cannot be immediately switched to a micro cell channel. The application of this overflow buffer is made feasible by the availability of the umbrella coverage of the macro cell. A modified Guard Channel policy is proposed in conjunction with the overflow buffer for the purpose of giving handoff requests higher priority without the aggressive blocking of new calls. Load balancing rules aimed at the careful selection of micro and macro cell channels are developed. Handoff and new call requests are classified into few categories and control techniques for handling each category are defined. Each allocation for a new channel requires a check on the load factor of the cell. A detailed simulation model was developed to evaluate the hierarchical scheme, refine its design, and compare its performance with four of the schemes previously proposed in the literature. The simulation tests were performed under different tele traffic conditions and parameter values. The performance comparison results obtained by our extensive tests have shown that the proposed scheme consistently reduces the average handoff dropping rate, increases the new call acceptance rate and enhances the throughput of the cellular system.

Graduation Date

2000

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Bassiouni, Mostafa A.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Format

PDF

Pages

79 p.

Language

English

Rights

Written permission granted by copyright holder to the University of Central Florida Libraries to digitize and distribute for nonprofit, educational purposes.

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0019576

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering; Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic

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