Keywords

Water pollution, Water quality, Florida

Abstract

The mass loadings of pollutants common in surface waters result from the discharges of many different sources. In the last few years it has been noted that nonpoint sources contribute more pollutants than point sources. This is because in many cases the point source discharges have been, by law, reduced drastically. In the State of Florida many water quality parameters were examined to estimate the mass loadings in streams related to, drainage area, average flow, land use, soil type and management practices. A total of sixteen streams were examined. The information was first calculated for mass loadings as a function of stream flow. Next the slopes and intercepts were related to drainage area. Both steps were accomplished using bi-variate regression analysis. The final results show a relationship of Total Organic Carbon, Orthophosphate, Total Phosphate and Nitrate to drainage area and stream flow. However, the final results of this study when related to another study in Florida showed different mass loading rates for TOC and TP. The differences were attributed to background levels of pollutants, local geology, hydrologic variability and management practices.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1976

Advisor

Wanielista, Martin P.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

viii, 55 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0012775

Subjects

Water -- Pollution -- Florida, Water quality -- Florida

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Engineering Commons

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