Keywords

Automobiles, Environment, Traffic engineering, Traffic signs and signals

Abstract

The hypothesis is that the recorded noise-imprints of a vehicle at an intersection can be used to identify and accurately time the driving modes of deceleration, idle, slow cruise, and acceleration. This is proven by analyzing and comparing noise-imprints of vehicles at an uncontrolled intersection marked first with a "stop" sign, and then by a "yield" and an experimental "dead slow" sign. By relating the duration of each driving mode to known relations, the overall efficiency of an intersection can be characterized. A new technique for studying various types of traffic conditions at intersections is the result. Initial noise-imprint analysis and comparison shows that a "yield" sign is to be preferred over a "stop" sign to decrease travel time, air pollution emissions, gasoline consumption, and wear-and-tear on the car. The experimental "dead slow" sign is used as a demonstration of the noise-imprint technique upon an unknown situation. The efficiency of a "dead slow" sign proved to be less than that of a "yield" sign, but still greater than that of a "stop" sign.

Graduation Date

1976

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

xi, 145 pages

Language

English

Rights

Written permission granted by copyright holder to the University of Central Florida Libraries to digitize and distribute for nonprofit, educational purposes.

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0003525

Subjects

Automobiles -- Environmental aspects, Traffic engineering, Traffic signs and signals

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Engineering Commons

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