Keywords

Railroad cars, Design and construction

Abstract

Mass transit vehicles in formal rail service frequently attain speeds which can excited carbody oscillations (primary hunting), as well as sustained lateral oscillations of the trucks (secondary hunting). The carbody motions have been shown to generate passenger discomfort and sustained truck hunting can lead to derailment. This thesis developed approximate equations which predict the carbody hunting frequencies, as well as the hunting speed of an articulated frame truck. The linear equations of motion are derived from a simplified model of a railway vehicle. A comparison indicates the results obtained using the approximate truck hunting equation presented here are within ten percent of the results obtained from more rigorous approaches reported by others.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1976

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

v, 42 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0012774

Subjects

Railroad cars -- Design and construction

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Engineering Commons

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