Keywords

Sex discrimination against women, Women executives

Abstract

An in-basket exercise was used to investigate the effects of sex-role stereotypes on selection evaluations of applicants for a management position. The independent variables consisted of (a) sex of the applicant (e.g. Janet N. Davis, James N. Davis) (b) the raters attitude toward women in management positions as measured by a questionnaire, and finally (c) the quality of information (e.g. biographical or behavioral). On the basis of information provided, 28 male and female subjects evaluated the applicants performance potential and suitability for a particular management position. The results confirmed the hypothesis that attitude toward women in management creates a discriminatory impact toward women on certain management dimensions when the evaluator is forced to predict behavior based on biographical information. However, when actual behavioral data about job performance is made available, discriminatory effects appear to be eliminated. Implications of these results are discussed.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

1976

Advisor

Frank, Fredric D.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Social Sciences

Degree Program

Industrial Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

viii, 105 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013095

Subjects

Sex discrimination against women, Women executives

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Share

COinS