Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate ‘sense of humor’ and a humorous external event as possible factors effecting functioning levels of the immune system for immunodeficient and non-immunodeficient populations. Specifically, it was to investigate the degree in which a humorous video effected levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) in AIDS patients and non-immunodeficient studetns. It was hypothesized that all subjects would show an increased level of SIgA after exposure to the humorous video. A greater immune response was expected from the non-immunodeficient group. However, a significant increased level of SIgA was still expected in the AIDS patients due to a more accurate method of measurement as opposed to past research. A nephelometer, which uses the scattering of light as a quantitative measurement, was used to measure the SIgA levels. The hypotheses could not be tested due to the probable protein degradation by bacteria. However, using Fisher’s z’ Transformation, inferences can be mad regarding the correlational results of the psychometric tests between the two groups. Post hoc comparisons also yielded significant findings regarding the AIDS group. The result have implications for future research and possible clinical applications. Further development of this procedure and research may lead to definite conclusions that the nervous system not only communicates with the immune system directly, but that it is also capable of preventing or decreasing vulnerability to illnesses and diseases.

Graduation Date

1997

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Brophy, James

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

95 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0020606

Subjects

Arts and Sciences -- Dissertations, Academic; Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Sciences

Share

COinS