Keywords

Audio visual education, Learning psychology

Abstract

This study was designed to test the null hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in the achievement of subjects who are taught the same concepts using two sets of visuals which differ in detail, complexity, accuracy of scale and use of background. A 20-item comprehension test produced non-significant differences between the simple and complex artwork treatments within both the Army Reserve and FTU samples. Subjects in both target audiences achieved approximately the same comprehension level even though the perceived the complex art to be significantly more adequate to teach. The major implication of this study is the possibility for dramatic savings in costs as well as time contributed to the development process of TEC lessons without a corresponding drop in teaching effectiveness. It was recommended that educators consider this and other related research when planning, designing, purchasing and using audio-visual instructional materials and training aids.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1978

Advisor

Hoglin, Giles

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Social Sciences

Degree Program

Communication

Format

PDF

Pages

iv, 45 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013423

Subjects

Audio visual education, Learning, Psychology of

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Communication Commons

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