Keywords

Psychotherapy, Recreational therapy

Abstract

The theoretical and historical foundations of body work and movement therapies are explored. Wilhelm Reich is credited with bringing into prominence the inclusion of the body in psychotherapy. His influence on Alexander Lowen and Fritz Perls is explored in detail. The importance in psychotherapy of breathing, energy, self-expression, spontaneous movement, and awareness is stressed. Six expressive movement therapies -- Gestalt body work, t'ai chi, encounter group exercises, bioenergetic therapy, psychomotor training, and dance therapy -- are described in detail. An evaluation and comparison of the various movement forms is offered, along with suggestions for outcome research in the area. The authors believe the inclusion of body work and expressive movement in psychotherapy is important, either as a sole intervention technique or as an adjunct to traditional verbal methods.

Graduation Date

Spring 1977

Advisor

Nickeson, Carl

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Social Sciences

Degree Program

Community Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

iii, 164 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013100

Subjects

Psychotherapy, Recreational therapy

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

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