Title

Student perceptions of corporal punishment on modifying behavior and school attitude

Abstract

The problem investigated in this study concerned whether students perceived corporal punishment as having an effect on their behavior and school attitude. The population consisted of 8th grade middle school male students in a large urban Florida school district. Perceptions were solicited from two groups of four schools categorized by levels of use of corporal punishment. Research questions addressed the effectiveness of corporal punishment in modifying behaviors and student attitudes. Attitudinal differences were examined between paddled and non-paddled students from schools in two different levels of use. Student connotations of corporal punishment were also investigated. Data were gathered during face-to-face interviews using two surveys, a Student Satisfaction Survey measuring students' satisfaction towards school and a Student Perception of Corporal Punishment Survey measuring student perceptions of the effectiveness of corporal punishment. Analysis of the data revealed: (1) There was a marginal statistically significant difference in perceived effectiveness of corporal punishment as a function of whether a student was paddled within both high and low levels of use schools; and (2) there was no statistically significant difference in school attitudes of students who were paddled as compared to students who were not paddled. There was also no statistically significant difference in attitudes towards schools between students who have and have not been paddled regardless of the school's level of use. The following conclusions were reached. Students perceived corporal punishment as not being an effective deterrent in modifying their behaviors. Paddled and nonpaddled students did not differ in their attitudes towards school, nor did the level of paddling in the schools have an impact on their school attitudes. Recommendations for future, related investigations are presented.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1990

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Bozeman, William C.

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Services

Format

Print

Pages

201 p.

Language

English

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0020781

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Education; Education -- Dissertations, Academic

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