Abstract

Until the early 1980s, most digital simulation models of reasonably complex systems required the use of a mainframe for a solution to be obtained in a timely manner. Recently, the declining prices of computer memory, operating systems, and modern hardware have supported the implementation of large simulation packages on smaller machines. Today, tremendous improvements in the performance of microcomputers have provided the simulationist with a completely personalized, less expensive computing environment. Operating within a microcomputer environment, the simulationist must choose a suitable computer language. Often, user familiarity dictates the selection of a language, while other factors such as ease of use, portability between hardware, speed, and adaptability to simulation tasks, should also be considered. Furthermore, other languages may exist that are particularly well suited for simulation in a microcomputer environment. This work will provide an initial database on the performance of two continuous simulation languages that will assist the practicing simulationist in his choice of which language and hardware resources to employ.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

1988

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Klee, Harold

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Engineering

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Written permission granted by copyright holder to the University of Central Florida Libraries to digitize and distribute for nonprofit, educational purposes.

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013882

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering; Engineering -- Dissertations, Academic

Included in

Engineering Commons

Share

COinS