Keywords

Crisis intervention, Mental health services, Hotlines, Counseling, Volunteer workers in social service

Abstract

It was hypothesized that the personality variable Tolerance for Ambiguity and empathic listening skills would significantly differentiate conscientious from nonconscientious crisis intervention volunteers. A group of 20 conscientious and a group of 20 nonconscientious volunteers from a local crisis intervention center were given a test of Tolerance for Ambiguity and a test of empathic listening skills that measured Interest, Understanding, and Response-ability. Results of t-tests between the groups and correlations between the variables indicated that Tolerance for Ambiguity was not a significant differentiator between the two groups. However, it was found that conscientious volunteers had significantly higher levels of Interest and Understanding. They did not differ in Response-ability. This study suggests that interest in clients and an understanding of their problems may be salient factors motivating crisis intervention volunteers. It was concluded that Interest and Understanding are relevant variables in crisis intervention volunteers. It is suggested that they be utilized in the screening of potential volunteers and in the planning of crisis intervention training.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Spring 1979

Advisor

Guest, Sandra S.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Social Sciences

Degree Program

Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

v, 52 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013234

Subjects

Crisis intervention (Mental health services), Hotlines (Counseling), Volunteer workers in social service

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Psychology Commons

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