Keywords

Self esteem, Sex role, Women psychology

Abstract

Three groups of women from undergraduate psychology classes at the University of Central Florida were exposed to an experimental treatment which consisted of either a feminist, anti-feminist or a sex-role neutral speech. All subjects were administered the Feminism II Scale prior to the treatment, and the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale both prior to and immediately following the treatment conditions. No posttest differences in total self-esteem scores were noted among the treatment conditions. The anti-feminist treatment sample did have significantly lower scores on the family self subscale of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale than either the feminist or control groups. Additionally, there were no significant posttest self-esteem differences between subjects scoring high versus low on the Feminism II Scale. A test for homogeneity of variance revealed significant treatment effects on the overall variability of the self-esteem change scores among the three treatment groups. Implications for the psychotherapeutic situation are discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Fall 1979

Advisor

Guest, Sandra S.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Social Sciences

Degree Program

Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

vi, 94 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013421

Subjects

Self esteem, Sex role, Women -- Psychology

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Psychology Commons

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