Abstract

The use of cognitively high level questions, those classified in Bloom's taxonomy at the application level and above, has been suggested as a teaching strategy which will help students develop critical thinking abilities. This study was designed to determine the effect of a program to teach nursing faculty how to ask cognitively high level questions. A convenience sample was used. Subjects in the treatment (N=10) and control (N=4) groups were faculty and the students in their clinical laboratory groups from four National League for Nursing accredited undergraduate nursing programs in the state of Florida. Pre- and post-intervention data on the cognitive level of questions asked in clinical post-conferences were collected by way of audiotapes recorded during the Fall 1991 semester. Members of the treatment group received an intervention which included and inservice class, subsequent feedback on questioning patterns, and a one hour seminar. Cognitive level of questions was coded using the Teacher Pupil Questioning Inventory. Descriptive statistics were used to compare data on the treatment and control group faculty and student percentages of cognitively high level questions. The significance of difference between groups was determined with the Mann-Whitney U Test. Prior to the intervention, faculty in the treatment group asked less cognitively high level questions than control group faculty. This difference was not statistically significant. After faculty in the treatment group participated in the intervention, their percentage of cognitively high level questions was higher than the percentage for the control group. The difference was statistically significant (p=.012). Prior to the intervention, students in the treatment group asked less cognitively high level questions than control group students. This difference was not statistically significant. After treatment group faculty participated in there intervention, the percentage of cognitively high level questions asked by students in their clinical groups dropped. The difference between percentages of cognitively high level questions asked by students in the treatment and control groups was still not statistically significant.

Graduation Date

1992

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Kysilka, Marcella

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Department

Educational Foundations

Degree Program

Curriculum and Instruction

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Written permission granted by copyright holder to the University of Central Florida Libraries to digitize and distribute for nonprofit, educational purposes.

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0008175

Share

COinS