Keywords

African Americans, Anger, Caucasian race, United States -- Race relations

Abstract

The present research was concerned with examining the presence of anger in black subjects and determining if and how the experience of anger influences their perceptions of other blacks as well as whites. The hypotheses underlying the present research were: (1) Blacks who inhibit anger (anger inhibited) would exhibit a greater likelihood of viewing whites positively while viewing blacks in a more negative fashion; (2) Blacks who express anger (anger expressed) would exhibit a greater likelihood of viewing blacks more positively while viewing whites in a more negative fashion; (3) Differences were anticipated in the ratings of black vis-a-vis white subjects and these differences were examined. subjects were 55 students drawn from the following sources: 28 (16 females, 12 males) white students from University of Central Florida psychology classes; 27 (19 females, 8 males) black students were obtained through the University of Central Florida Office of Minority Affairs. The mean age for black subjects was 20.0, while the mean age for whites was 25.5. The Anger Self Report (A.S.R.) was used to delineate 12 black and 14 white subjects who tend to inhibit anger from 15 black and 14 white subjects whose tendencies are toward the expression of anger. Blacks and whites, in separated groups, then viewed and rated 50 photographs depicting blacks and whites on eight personality dimensions. The analysis of the data showed that black anger expressers do, in fact, rate blacks significantly higher than whites. On the other hand, anger inhibited blacks and whites showed no preference when presented with an identical stimulus situation. White anger expressers also showed no preference.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1984

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Blau, Burton I.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

48 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0015549

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