Keywords

Personality, Role conflict, Stress (Psychology)

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moderating effects of personality variables on the relationship of role stress to performance. The sample consisted of 45 males and 57 females from undergraduate psychology classes at the University of Central Florida. Subjects completed the Adjective Check List (Gough & Heilbrun, 1965), a written decision-making exercise, and a derivative of the role conflict and role ambiguity scales developed by Rizzo, House, and Lirtzman (1970). these yielded personality, performance, and stress scores for each subject. Each personality variable (achievement, aggression, autonomy, flexibility, and introversion) was partialed out of the relationship between role conflict and performance and between role ambiguity and performance. T-tests revealed that the partial correlations did not differ significantly from the zero-order correlations. Furthermore, individuals who scored high on a designated personality variable did not have higher mean role stress scores than persons scoring low on that personality variable. These findings indicate that the personality variables are not related to role stress (except for achievement and role ambiguity, p< .01) and that these variables have no significant impact on the relationship between role stress and performance.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1984

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Wooten, William

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

61 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0015563

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