Keywords

Learning disabilities, Self esteem

Abstract

This study investigates the self-esteem of learning disabled students required to attend learning disabilities classes. Subjects were 35 7th- through 9th-grade, male and female learning disabled (LD) students. Nineteen of the subjects attended at least one resource LD class while the other 16 subjects attended mainstream classes. These groups were matched on intelligence quotients (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised) and reading comprehension standard scores (Peabody Individual Achievement Test) so that no significant differences between the groups, on these measures, existed. The Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (Fitts, 1965) was administered to all subjects, along with the closing question, "Does attendance in learning disabilities classes affect how much you like yourself?". The results indicated that age, sex, and LD class attendance, do not affect the self-esteem scores of junior high learning disabled students (ANOVA, p > .05). Thus, the hypothesis that LD class attendance affects the self-esteem of junior high school learning disabled students was negated. A majority of subjects also verbally support the notion that LD class attendance does not affect self-esteem. Further research is indicated with female learning disabled subjects because results were close to being significant.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1984

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Blau, Burton I.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

58 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0015584

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