Keywords

Storm water retention basins, Water quality management

Abstract

Stormwater detention systems as they are frequently designed do not provide good water quality control of stormwater runoff. A filtration media to be used in conjunction with detention ponds to improve their pollutant removal efficiencies was tested at the University of Central Florida and found to be effective. The filtration media, which consisted of a mixture of sand and alum sludge, substantially improved effluent water quality. Average reductions of over 80 % were observed in concentrations of dissolved orthophosphorus, total orthophosphorus and total phosphorus. Reductions were also experienced in iron, aluminum, copper and zinc concentrations. A prototype filtration model is presently being tested on the Lake Eola watershed in Orlando, Florida. A stormwater management and design aid computer program originally written by Tim Curran (Curran 1980) to calculate stormwater hydrographs and retention volumes, and updated by the author to also calculate detention volumes will incorporate results from the prototype study.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Summer 1980

Advisor

Wanielista, Martin P.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

vi, 42 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013332

Subjects

Storm water retention basins, Water quality management

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Included in

Engineering Commons

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