Keywords

Cities and towns -- Florida -- Orlando, Community power, Curtis H. Stanton Energy Center, Orlando, Fla, Local government -- Florida -- Orlando

Abstract

This study builds on the work on community power structure which had evolved since the publication of the Lynds' Middletown. An empirical examination of the conflict over the proposed construction of the Orlando Utilities Commission's Curtis H. Stanton Energy Center is undertaken in the context of alternative hypotheses concerning the structure of power. The theoretical positions of the two major schools of community power structure--plural-elitist and single-elitist--are examined. The origins and arguments for the plant are presented, and the origins, tactics and counter-arguments of the opposition to the plant are also examined. The interaction and development of the conflict between the opposing strategies is then analyzed. This study concludes that in the case of the Stanton energy Center, the single-elitist hypothesis was confirmed. A small, business-oriented elite, having control over major financial resources and access to the mass media, overwhelmed public advocacy groups which had a narrow base of support, few organizational and financial resources, and little cohesion.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

1985

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Stern, Mark

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Political Science

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0016501

Share

COinS