Keywords

Obesity, Weight loss

Abstract

In an attempt to replicate and extend previous research on the validity of food diary records, 18 obese and 16 previously obese individuals from the community were quizzed on food recording and kcalorie estimation in a controlled analogue of self-monitoring. Results of the experimental phase of the study replicate those of previous studies indicating that the food diaries of obese clients are invalid because of poor food descriptions, incorrect quantity estimates, and errors in converting kcalories. The results also indicate that subjects tend to overestimate quantities and kcalories of foods. However, the present study extended previous research by examining the differences between obese and previously obese individuals. It was thought that weight differences might be a function, to some degree, of the person’s accuracy at food recording, quantity of portion and kcalorie estimation. The present results suggested no relationship between current weight and accuracy. The implications of this finding suggests that success at weight loss may not be significantly related to an individual’s ability at food description, quantity of portion and ability in kcalorie estimation, as was suggested by previous studies. The results of this study strongly question the validity of self-reports in food consumption. Its implications in research and practice were examined. The assessment phase of the study obtained information via a questionnaire on 177 individuals involved in a weight control program. The areas in the questionnaire consisted of: (a) general information, (b) health, (c) environment, (d) emotional aspects of eating, (e) exercise. The findings support past research on obesity, and revealed some areas of interest for future research.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1985

Semester

Fall

Advisor

McGuire, John M.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0017161

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