Keywords

Fishes, Poecilia latipinna, Poeciliidae

Abstract

Life history tactics of three Central Florida populations of Poecilia latipinna were compared to those predicted by life history selection theory. The three populations were sampled monthly for one year. At each sampling period a series of physicochemical measurements were taken to determine the degree of spatial and temporal environmental heterogeneity within each site. Life history traits determined for each population included size at maturity, size specific fecundity, reproductive effort, and length, weight, and condition of offspring. The population inhabiting the most variable environment was characterized by smaller size at maturity, lower size specific fecundity, lower overall reproductive output, and larger, more robust young. In all cases reproductive effort decreased with increasing female length, although the exact nature of this relationship varied between sites. The observed life history tactics do not fit the hypotheses of bet hedging or r-and K- selection theory, but support the idea that life history traits may vary independently rather than being inherited as coadapted units.

Notes

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Graduation Date

1985

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Snelson, Franklin F.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Degree Program

Biology

Format

PDF

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0017166

Contributor (Linked data)

Snelson, Franklin F. [VIAF]

Snelson, Franklin F. [LC]

Included in

Biology Commons

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