Keywords

Groundwater flow, Hydrology -- Computer programs, Hydrology -- Research, Ponds -- Computer programs, Precipitation (Meteorology), Runoff, Watersheds -- Research

Abstract

Most recently, research on stormwater detention ponds has focused on designs and operations that will imporve the water quality of the discharge. Historically stormwater detention ponds were used to reduce the rate of runoff from the watershed area of using temporary storage to attenuate flow rates. The study site was located near Orlando, Florida, and consisted of a detention pond, namely Lake Angel, which received stormwater runoff from a 131-acre area. Hydrologic data such as precipitation, runoff, and pond outflow were measured at the site. Total and suspended solids data for the pond outflow and stormwater runoff also were collected at the site. Using these data both the hydrologic budget and solids removal efficiency of the detention pond were determined. Pond outflow was measured continuously and 319 solids determinations were made. However, all data were simulated on an hourly basis. A computer program, STORCALC, was written to simulate inlet and outlet flow rates and solids concentrations. Groundwater inflow rates were determined from a hydrologic balance verfied by water table measurements and equations for groundwater flow. Solids removal efficiencies were determined based on concentration and mass. There was a significant difference between concentration and mass removal efficiences, thus, it was concluded that detention ponds with groundwater inflow can have a negative removal efficiency of total and suspened solids based on the runoff and pond outflow mass while having a positive removal efficiency of total and suspended solids based on concentration.

Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Wanielista, Martin P.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Department

Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences

Format

PDF

Pages

140 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0020336

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