Keywords

Exercise, Job satisfaction, Job stress, Physical fitness, Stress (Psychology)

Abstract

Stress in organizations is a critical phenomenon of our times. Research to date has focused on specific job-related stressors such as role conflict, ambiguity and supervisory relationships utilizing satisfaction and performance as outcome variables. Results have often been ambiguous and non-conclusive. However, a variety of common physiological responses have been found to play a major role ins tress reaction and management. Furthermore, numerous studies have demonstrated a moderating effect of exercise on physiological stress responses. This correlational study, based on a hypothetical Interactive Process Model of Stress Correlates, where fitness is the measure of stress, proposed to link stress-related variables with job satisfaction and performance. It was hypothesizd that a positive relationship between fitness and performance/satisfaction would emerge. However, analyses of date from sixty-four engineers at a major corporation in Orlando, Florida, found no such relationships. Presented here are a review of pertinent literature, study results and examination of why a relationship between fitness and performance/satisfaction may not be a straightforward as predicted.

Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Abbott, David W.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Degree Program

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

54 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0019489

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