Keywords

College student orientation, Community college students, Prediction of scholastic success

Abstract

A study was conducted at Valencia Community College to determine whether an improved student performance and retention. An orientation, based on the expressed needs of students, was provided to first-time, full-time students. The orientation consisted of an introduction to the institution and its resources, academic skill training, and personal resources management training. There were 22 students who participated for one day, 25 students who participated for two days of orientation, and a control group of 72 students. Although the behavioral outcomes were not generally statistically significant, the trends of all of the dependent measures, i.e., enrollment and withdrawal, were in a positive direction, favoring greater amounts of orientation. The orientation treatment was substantially more effective for students who had a 2.0 GPA or less, than those who had a GPA above 2.0. All of the dependent measures improved for the lower GPA students as the amount of orientation increased, but remained relatively constant for the higher GPA students. Apparently, the orientation is most effective for those students most in need of the improvement.

Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Dziuban, Charles D.

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education

Degree Program

Curriculum and Instruction

Format

PDF

Pages

224 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0019508

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