Abstract

Very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit technology has offered the opportunity to design algorithms and data structures for direct implementation in integrat4ed circuits. In order to take full advantage of this opportunity, the designer must understand the geometric limitations of the technology. Because the interconnections between components in a VLSI circuit are costly in both chip area and performance, the designer must consider the complexity of the data paths between components when selecting algorithms and architecture. Systolic architectures offer a way to implement massively parallel special-purpose systems in VLSI circuits while minimizing costly interconnections between processing components. In a systolic system, data flows from memory in a rhythmic fashion, passing through many processing elements before it returns to memory. Some of the architectural issues of VLSI design are presented, and the applications and advantages of systolic architectures in the design of special-purpose hardware using VLSI technology are discussed. A systolic priority queue and a systolic array for band matrix multiplication are presented as application examples.

Graduation Date

1986

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Petrasko, Brian

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

30 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0020384

Included in

Engineering Commons

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