Abstract

The purpose of this research report is to discuss the development and results of a computer program (GASDYNAMICS) that solves a variety of compressible one-dimensional (1-D) steady gas dynamics problems utilizing the algebraic equations that result from the governing differential equations assuming perfect gas condition. This report shows how the governing differential equations that are derived from the ideal gas law, the definition of Mach number and the fundamental conservation laws of mass, energy, and momentum can be developed into their algebraic forms when additional simplifying assumptions are made. GASDYNAMICS solves problems for either a converging or a converging –diverging nozzle followed by a constant diameter duct where either friction and/or heating occur. Any ideal gas may be assumed. The program performs analysis necessary to find the location of the shocks in either the nozzle or the duct. This analysis requires an evaluation of the backpressure to inlet stagnation pressure relationship in addition to friction and/or heating terms to determine which, if either, factors will drive the shock location. GASDYNAMICS requires that the operator respond to a series of questions concerning identification of the gas, initial stagnation properties, and duct to nozzle throat geometry. GASDYNAMICS outputs a tabulation of static pressure, stagnation pressure, static temperature, Mach number, mass flowrate per unit area, velocity and density at discrete points along the flowpath. These values are expressed in metric units. GASDYNAMICS was written using the Applesoft Basic Language on an Apple IIE Computer. The program has been modified by changing the program syntax to Microsoft Basic language. This modification, along with proper disk format, allows the program to run on either the Apple MacIntosh or IBM computers.

Graduation Date

1987

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Eno, Burton E.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

140 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0020598

Included in

Engineering Commons

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