Keywords

Persuasion (Psychology)

Abstract

Students in basic speech courses served as subjects in a study designed to test the efficacy of denial as a restorative agent after subjects' exposure to a belief-lowering attack. Denial was operationalized in two ways: (a) as a simple statement whereby the ostensible source of the attack message denied any connection with the attack, and (b) as a denial plus counter-assertion where the source additionally asserted an opinion directly contrary to that expressed i the attack. Denial treatments were administered either immediately, two days, or seven days after subjects' receipt of the attack message. While the immediate simple denial treatment produced Type 1 resistance, no differences were found in final belief levels across the six restorative treatments. The data failed to support the predicted superiority of denial plus counter-assertion over simple denial as a restorer of belief.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Summer 1981

Advisor

Pryor, Bert

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Communication

Format

PDF

Pages

43 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013365

Included in

Communication Commons

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