Keywords

Environmental monitoring, Remote sensing

Abstract

There is new evidence that global earth resources satellite net will be practical. This paper weighs recent advances in remote sensing to pinpoint the dominant constraints. The data and sensor systems interfacing requirements are critically reviewed. It is shown that conventional optics constraints can be relaxed, with the newer systems, based on multi-spectral imagery and statistical processing methods. The most powerful computational methods use algorithms based on a Gaussian assumption for the species vector in feature space, but biases in the imagery limit their efficiency. A rationale is proposed: improving the observational network calibrating efficiency will also improve the photogrammetric removal of imagery biases, and thereby increase signature detection efficiency. The author discloses an unexpected finding: while conventional resolution degrades with satellite altitude, signature detectability should improve since calibration improves dramatically with altitude. A unique global network is then described than can exploit these new developments. The scope of this subject is so broad that despite the paper's length (sixty pages), a quantitative treatment is not practical; the author uses a combination of classical analysis, bibliographic research, and conservative technological assumptions based on the current state-of-the-art.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

Summer 1973

Advisor

Phillips, Ronald L.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Environmental Systems Management

Format

PDF

Pages

vi, 63 pages

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0012255

Subjects

Environmental monitoring -- Remote sensing, Remote sensing

Collection (Linked data)

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Share

COinS