Keywords

Leisure -- Psychological aspects, Medical personnel, Work -- Psychological aspects

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between work and leisure satisfaction using Shepard's Status Recognition Model. The sample was made up of two groups of health services personnel each of which contained three work levels or groups: a support group, a clinical group, and an administrative group. Assuming that status recognition would be different for the low status jobs (support) and high status jobs (clinical and administrative), it was hypothesized that the high status group would display low work related alienation and thus show a positive correlation between work and leisure satisfaction (evidence of a spillover mechanism). The lower status group was hypothesized to display high work related alienation and thus show a satisfaction (evidence of a compensatory mechanism). Analysis of 85 questionnaires confirmed the primary hypothesis that high status workers would display a spillover mechanism between work and leisure attitudes. The low negative correlation between overall work and leisure satisfaction in the support group was indicative of a compensatory mechanism, particularly when controlled for whether individuals were leaders or participants in their leisure roles. Results were discussed in the context of work centrality, and a modified version of Shepard's Status Recognition Model was proposed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Summer 1983

Advisor

Turnage, Janet J.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

80 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0014004

Included in

Psychology Commons

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