Keywords

Self perception

Abstract

The purpose of the experiment was to contrast a person's adherence to private and public standards of conduct under varying situational settings. Prior to the experimental session female undergraduate students filled out a questionnaire that asked about their own attitudes towards exercising. Two types of subjects were brought into the laboratory: those who privately favored exercise but believed that others would not approve of their exercise (henceforth referred to as "positive discrepancy" subjects), and those who privately did not favor exercise, but anticipated approval for it (henceforth referred to as "negative discrepancy" subjects). The laboratory setting involved pedaling a stationary bicycle under the pretext of researching the effects of exercise on mood. Each subjects was exposed to two types of self-awareness manipulations. Subjects performed by themselves in from of a mirror (private self-awareness manipulation), and promised to publicly exercise by choosing to pedal a self-determined number of laps on a subsequent session (public self-awareness manipulation). therefore, for each subject, two dependent measures were recorded. Private exercise was measured by the time spent pedaling alone in front of the mirror. The measure of public exercise was "behavioroid" in nature, as subjects did not actually pedal around the "course". Subjects were led to believed, however, that they would need to adhere[e] to their commitment.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Spring 1983

Advisor

Fisher, Randy D.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Degree Program

Clinical Psychology

Format

PDF

Pages

37 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0013993

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