Keywords

Heat -- Transmission

Abstract

This study had a two-fold purpose. The initial emphasis was placed upon the analysis of heat transfer to ambient air from a rotating cylinder. Three distinct heat transfer regimes can be identified. For low rotational speeds corresponding to a Reynolds number less than the critical value for initiation of turbulence, the flow is laminar and the rotation has no effect on the average heat transfer coefficient. In the transition region, the heat transfer coefficient depends upon both natural convection and rotational effects. For higher rotational velocities, the flow is fully turbulent and rotational effects dominate. Previous analytical and experimental studies have been conducted for all three regions. These studies are summarized in this thesis and it is seen that there are gaps and limitations in the existing state of knowledge. Therefore, further study is required especially for high rotational speeds. In the second phase of study, an experimental program was designed to determine heat transfer coefficients at various rotational speeds and heat transfer rates. The rotating cylinder is designed in such a way that it can be inclined by 30┬░, 45┬░, 60┬░, or 90┬░ with horizontal. High rotational speeds are possible yielding Reynolds numbers of 2 x 105. The maximum power is approximately 400 W.

Notes

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Graduation Date

Spring 1983

Advisor

Bishop, Patricia J.

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering

Degree Program

Engineering

Format

PDF

Pages

72 p.

Language

English

Rights

Public Domain

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Identifier

DP0014088

Included in

Engineering Commons

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