Teaching Electronic Literature

Submission Type

Panel

Start Date/Time (EDT)

21-7-2024 10:30 AM

End Date/Time (EDT)

21-7-2024 11:30 AM

Location

Hypertexts & Fictions

Abstract

Exploring electronic literature gives students skills in reading, connecting, and writing in dimensions far beyond a static text. These works become ever more crucial as technology evolves and students embrace virtual reality, gaming, and more. After forty years of writing E-lit, we now have a wonderful body of works that can be taught at all levels. By pooling our resources (syllabi, course materials, approaches), we can create more vibrant courses and help students explore the relationships and meaning within navigation, linking, imagery, sound, games, etc. Teaching electronic literature at all levels and ensuring that electronic literature is a vital part of any curriculum.

However, electronic literature is dynamic, as works are practically ephemeral (has the software or platform disappeared like Flash or Twitter, did the creators pay the bill to keep their website up, are there internet or technological barriers, etc. etc.). Moreover, it is difficult to insert E-lit or create E-lit classes within academia considering the wide range of educational, cultural, and infrastructural specificities across the world. We need a solid base of recommended works and pedagogical approaches. The resources at https://teach.eliterature.org/ are great, but need to be updated. This workshop will help bring together educators to create sharable resources. We will create a google doc before the conference to list resources, gather materials during the workshop, trade ideas and approaches, and then use this to help update ELO’s resources for teaching.

Discussing the methodologies and pedagogical approaches for teaching Electronic Literature employed by various educators will also help to reflect on the innovative ways in which literature teaching and literary education has evolved in the digital age.

The following questions will be addressed during the panel discussion:

  1. What are the different ways in which E-lit can be taught and incorporated within a curriculum?
  2. What are the barriers/concerns surrounding the same and how they can be addressed?
  3. What works have you taught?
  4. What approaches have you taken?
  5. How have students responded?
  6. What resonates well with students?
  7. What concepts may be difficult for students to understand and how have you addressed that?

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Jul 21st, 10:30 AM Jul 21st, 11:30 AM

Teaching Electronic Literature

Hypertexts & Fictions

Exploring electronic literature gives students skills in reading, connecting, and writing in dimensions far beyond a static text. These works become ever more crucial as technology evolves and students embrace virtual reality, gaming, and more. After forty years of writing E-lit, we now have a wonderful body of works that can be taught at all levels. By pooling our resources (syllabi, course materials, approaches), we can create more vibrant courses and help students explore the relationships and meaning within navigation, linking, imagery, sound, games, etc. Teaching electronic literature at all levels and ensuring that electronic literature is a vital part of any curriculum.

However, electronic literature is dynamic, as works are practically ephemeral (has the software or platform disappeared like Flash or Twitter, did the creators pay the bill to keep their website up, are there internet or technological barriers, etc. etc.). Moreover, it is difficult to insert E-lit or create E-lit classes within academia considering the wide range of educational, cultural, and infrastructural specificities across the world. We need a solid base of recommended works and pedagogical approaches. The resources at https://teach.eliterature.org/ are great, but need to be updated. This workshop will help bring together educators to create sharable resources. We will create a google doc before the conference to list resources, gather materials during the workshop, trade ideas and approaches, and then use this to help update ELO’s resources for teaching.

Discussing the methodologies and pedagogical approaches for teaching Electronic Literature employed by various educators will also help to reflect on the innovative ways in which literature teaching and literary education has evolved in the digital age.

The following questions will be addressed during the panel discussion:

  1. What are the different ways in which E-lit can be taught and incorporated within a curriculum?
  2. What are the barriers/concerns surrounding the same and how they can be addressed?
  3. What works have you taught?
  4. What approaches have you taken?
  5. How have students responded?
  6. What resonates well with students?
  7. What concepts may be difficult for students to understand and how have you addressed that?