Keywords

Resiliency, poverty, principal, leadership, urban

Abstract

The number of children living in poverty within the United States is on the rise, which translates to more public school students experiencing those risk factors associated with poverty. Given the severity of the negative effect living in poverty has on the likelihood of academic success, paired with the current climate of accountability in U.S. public schools, it is imperative that educational leaders understand how to create a school culture that fosters resilience in students from poverty. The purpose of this study was to examine principals' lived experiences in childhood poverty impacts the decisions they make. More precisely, it examines how their childhood affects their decision making in regard to creating a culture of academic resilience for students living in low socioeconomic conditions. Additionally, this study identified strategies that are effective, as perceived by school principals who grew up in low socioeconomic conditions, in creating a culture of resilience to improve academic success for students living in low socioeconomic conditions. This study provides valuable information to school leaders who strive to create an environment that fosters educational resilience in children living in poverty. The results are particularly salient to principals, as the information comes directly from the perspective of school principals who grew up in poverty, were educationally resilient, and are now creating a school atmosphere that fosters educational resilience in their students who live in poverty.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Martin, Suzanne

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Degree Program

Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005696

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005696

Language

English

Release Date

May 2015

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2015; it will then be open access.

Included in

Education Commons

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