Keywords

Mtorc1, mtor pathway, hormone hypothesis, volume, intensity

Abstract

The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway appears to be the primary regulator of protein synthesis and growth. While resistance exercise paradigms are often divided into hypertrophy (HYP) and strength (STR) protocols, it is unknown whether these protocols differentially stimulate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to examine mTORC1 signaling in conjunction with circulating hormone concentrations following a typical lower-body HYP and STR resistance exercise protocol. Ten resistance-trained men (24.7±3.4y; 90.1±11.3kg; 176.0±4.9cm) performed each resistance exercise protocol in a random, counterbalanced order. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (BL), immediately (IP), 30 minutes (30P), 1 hour (1H), 2 hours (2H), and 5 hours (5H) post-exercise. Fine needle muscle biopsies were completed at BL, 1H, and 5H. Electromyography of the vastus lateralis was also recorded during each protocol. HYP and STR produced a similar magnitude of muscle activation across sets. Myoglobin and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were significantly greater following STR compared to HYP (p=0.01-0.02), whereas the lactate response was significantly higher following HYP compared to STR (p=0.003). The GH, cortisol, and insulin responses were significantly greater following HYP compared to STR (p=0.0001-0.04). No significant differences between protocols were observed for the IGF-1 or testosterone response. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed a significantly greater (p=0.03) phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor at 1H following HYP compared to STR. Phosphorylation status of all other signaling proteins including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), p70S6k (ribosomal S6 kinase 1), and RPS6 (ribosomal protein S6) were not significantly different between trials. Despite significant differences in markers of muscle damage and the endocrine response following STR and HYP, both protocols appeared to elicit similar mTORC1 activation in resistance-trained men.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2015

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Hoffman, Jay

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Degree Program

Education; Exercise Physiology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0005621

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0005621

Language

English

Release Date

May 2016

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2016; it will then be open access.

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