Keywords

Field programmable gate arrays, Light emitting diodes

Abstract

In recent years, Light-emitting Diodes (LEDs) have become a promising candidate for backlighting Liquid Crystal Displays [1] (LCDs). Compared with traditional Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps (CCFLs) technology, LEDs offer not only better visual quality, but also improved power efficiency. However, to fully utilized LEDs' capability requires dynamic independent control of individual LEDs, which remains as a challenging topic. A FPGA-based hardware system for LED backlight control is proposed in this work. We successfully achieve dynamic adjustment of any individual LED's intensity in each of the three color channels (Red, Green and Blue), in response to a real time incoming video stream. In computing LED intensity, four video content processing algorithms have been implemented and tested, including averaging, histogram equalization, LED zone pattern change detection and non-linear mapping. We also construct two versions of the system. The first employs an embedded processor which performs the above-mentioned algorithms on pre-processed video data; the second embodies the same functionality as the first on fixed hardware logic for better performance and power efficiency. The system servers as the backbone of a consolidated display, which yields better visual quality than common commercial displays, we build in collaboration with a group of researchers from CREOL at UCF.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2010

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Zhou, Huiyang

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Computer Science

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0003351

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0003351

Language

English

Release Date

August 2010

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Engineering and Computer Science, Engineering and Computer Science -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until August 2010; it will then be open access.

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