Keywords

Golden age literature, maria de zayas, novelas amorosas y ejemplares, feminism, desenganos amorosos, la traicion en la amistad

Abstract

This is a study about María de Zayas y Sotomayor, a seventeenth century Spanish writer who has slowly but surely started to become one of the most read and researched female writers of her time among current scholars. Zayas’s work is that of a baroque writer and as such her critics are notorious for having divergent views about her work. The purpose of this study is to discern the reason behind the controversy that exists about her narrative. The present study is an attempt to elucidate the ambiguity around the feminist views Zayas has been adjudicated. Taking into consideration her context as a female writer amidst a patriarchal society and her social status as a member of the nobility, this study analyses some of the apparent contradictions that critics underscore to support their conclusions. It has been the purpose of this study to include a diverse group of critical views in order to come to a conclusion about her literary opus: her only known dramatic play La traición en la amistad followed by her two collections of short stories Novelas amorosas ejemplares and Desengaños amorosos. Additionally, this study considers other realms of study that would benefit from a more profound study by future researchers.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2012

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Garcia, Martha

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Arts and Humanities

Department

Modern Languages

Degree Program

Spanish

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004800

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004800

Language

English

Release Date

June 2014

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Arts and Humanities -- Dissertations, Academic, Dissertations, Academic -- Arts and Humanities

Restricted to the UCF community until June 2014; it will then be open access.

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