Keywords

Immigrant students, stereotypes, cultural identity, perceptions of similarity, academic achievement

Abstract

For decades, the United States has been known as the nation of immigrants due to the increasing number of immigrant students in the public school system. Although the population of immigrant students steadily increases annually, American society still pressures immigrants into acculturation to fulfill the United States ideals of academic achievement despite the United States claim of multiculturalism (Malcolm & Lowery, 2011). This research focuses on 1st - and 2nd generation immigrant students’ strife of acceptance in U.S. culture, while sill preserving their own native culture, and the influence it has on academic achievement. The researcher interviewed eight (8) adult participants who are either 1st - or 2nd generation immigrant college students. This qualitative case study research aims to determine if forced acculturation or assimilation using stereotypes and perceptions of similarity effects how immigrant students develop their cultural identity, and the influence it has on academic achievement. Four major themes emerged from the participants’ responses: parental approval, peer pressure, environmental influence, and feelings about their ethnic group. Basic findings supported that immigrant students’ cultural identity is threatened by stereotypes and perceptions of similarity.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2013

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Szente, Judit

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Education and Human Performance

Department

Child, Family, and Community Sciences

Degree Program

Early Childhood Development and Education

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004996

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004996

Language

English

Release Date

December 2013

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Education, Education -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2013; it will then be open access.

Included in

Education Commons

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