Keywords

Intestinal cells, fatty acid peroxides, atherosclerosis

Abstract

Over the past few years the number of deaths caused due to cardiovascular diseases has been increasing and is of major concern. In the United States, 75% of cardiovascular-related deaths have been attributed to atherosclerosis. Western diets containing large quantities of peroxidized lipids are considered atherogenic. Heated oil in the form of fried food brings high levels of peroxidized fat and its decomposition products in the diet. Peroxidized lipids are known to increase the susceptibility of serum lipoproteins to undergo oxidation, thereby contributing to the progression of atherosclerosis. The intestinal cells are responsible for the absorption of dietary fatty acid peroxides (FAOOH) which has been reported to enhance anti-atherosclerotic effects by inducing apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) gene and protein levels. Therefore, there is a void in the knowledge of when to expect “harmful” or “beneficial” effects of dietary lipid peroxides. The formation of toxic products like aldehydes from the decomposition of FAOOH is well documented. On the other hand, carboxylic acids particularly azelaic acid, formed as an end product of FAOOH decomposition has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects. Hence, we hypothesize that intestinal cells may decompose FAOOH to aldehydes, which might get converted to carboxylic acids that can be transported across the intestine. Linoleic acid is the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) present in the diet. So, we will use peroxidized linoleic acid (13- HPODE) and incubate with intestine derived cells or Caco-2 cells as an in-vitro model for determining its decomposition to aldehydes and carboxylic acids. We propose that the decomposition products of FAOOH in the presence of intestinal cells might be iv responsible for causing an increase in apoA1 levels, which might suggest that lipid peroxidation derived products might actually be beneficial for reducing the progression of atherosclerosis as compared to the absorption of intact FAOOH.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2013

Semester

Summer

Advisor

Parthasarathy, Sampath

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Medicine

Department

Molecular Biology and Microbiology

Degree Program

Biotechnology

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0004856

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0004856

Language

English

Release Date

August 2014

Length of Campus-only Access

1 year

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Subjects

Dissertations, Academic -- Medicine, Medicine -- Dissertations, Academic

Restricted to the UCF community until August 2014; it will then be open access.

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