Keywords

agents, meta-language, military, communications

Abstract

Humans carry mental models concerning the behaviors, looks, and operation of products, tools, and items used in their daily lives. When these items do not fit a user's conceptual model confusion and inefficiency occur. There are four basic types of mental models based on interactive activities: 1) instructing, 2) conversing, 3) manipulating and navigating, and 4) exploring and browsing. This thesis will focus on the conversing conceptual model and its application to communications between human-agent teams to best fit a user's mental model for that communication. A non-anthropomorphic framework does not exist for use in military applications such as; target detection, nuclear, biological, and chemical agent detection, and explosive ordinance disposal. As agents become increasingly autonomous and complex in the currently military working environment an effective and un-confusing non-anthropomorphic meta-language framework must be explored and developed to fulfill the need for human-agent communications. The meta-language framework may consist of visual and audio cues as pose, motion, color, and non-speech sounds. This thesis will attempt to identify and evaluate a non-anthropomorphic framework of communications between human-human, human-agents, and agent-agent teams that will maximize the effectiveness of the communications in terms of efficiency and interpretation.

Notes

If this is your thesis or dissertation, and want to learn how to access it or for more information about readership statistics, contact us at STARS@ucf.edu

Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Proctor, Michael

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Industrial Engineering and Management Systems

Degree Program

Industrial Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001687

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001687

Language

English

Release Date

May 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2007; it will then be open access.

Share

COinS