Keywords

criminal mobility, criminal travel, journey-to-crime, robbery, geocode, GIS

Abstract

The current paper addresses the mobility and willingness to travel of robbery offenders. A five-sector robbery typology was constructed, consisting of: personal robbery, commercial robbery, carjacking robbery, home-invasion robbery, and robbery by sudden snatching. Defining mobility as the straight-line distance between the offender's home residence and the location of the robbery offense, the extent of criminal mobility for each type of robbery offense was analyzed. Using geographical information system (GIS) technologies and, more specifically, geocoding software programs, the latitudinal and longitudinal coordinates of the offender's home and offense's location was determined. It was found that a subset of robbery offenders exhibit relatively high mobility across all five robbery types. However, distinct mobility patterns also emerged between the different types of robbery offenses. Policy and research implications from these findings are discussed.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Watkins, R. Cory

Degree

Master of Science (M.S.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Department

Criminal Justice and Legal Studies

Degree Program

Criminal Justice

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001588

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001588

Language

English

Release Date

May 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2007; it will then be open access.

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