Keywords

Environmental politics, policy, security, indigenous, world-system, Panama, environmental security, capitalism

Abstract

The current global capitalist system is at odds with environmental protection and the protection of indigenous people that are directly linked to the land on which they live. In environmental security literature, many have argued that, theoretically and functionally, it is possible to link national security with environmental security. However possible this may be on paper, in practice, the global capitalist system prevents this from becoming a reality. Using a world-systems approach, this thesis will show that core countries seeking to expand capital by tapping into new markets, locating new sources of raw materials and even forming strategic military partnerships in periphery countries unavoidably degrade the natural environment and thus, adversely affect the lives and health of indigenous people. It is also the argument in this paper that the primary purpose of strategic military partnerships with periphery states, such as those formed in Panama and Colombia, are primarily meant to protect economic interests, thus perpetuating the capitalist cycle. The end result is that, while it is theoretically possible, through a different theoretical lens, to bridge the definitional and theoretical gulf between national security and environmental security, the reality of the system subverts this endeavor, and will continue to do so under its current configuration.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Fall

Advisor

Jacques, Peter

Degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

College

College of Sciences

Department

Political Science

Degree Program

Political Science

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001981

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001981

Language

English

Release Date

December 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Masters Thesis (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until December 2007; it will then be open access.

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