Keywords

ionosphere, solar irradiance, geomagnetic activity, statistical time series analysis, filters, wavelets

Abstract

The dependence of equatorial ionosphere on solar irradiances and geomagnetic activity are studied in this dissertation using signal processing techniques. The statistical time series, digital signal processing and wavelet methods are applied to study the ionospheric variations. The ionospheric data used are the Total Electron Content (TEC) and the critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2). Solar irradiance data are from recent satellites, the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) satellite and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. The Disturbance Storm-Time (Dst) index is used as a proxy of geomagnetic activity in the equatorial region. The results are summarized as follows. (1) In the short-term variations ≤ 27-days, the previous three days solar irradiances have significant correlation with the present day ionospheric data using TEC, which may contribute 18% of the total variations in the TEC. The 3-day delay between solar irradiances and TEC suggests the effects of neutral densities on the ionosphere. The correlations between solar irradiances and TEC are significantly higher than those using the F10.7 flux, a conventional proxy for short wavelength band of solar irradiances. (2) For variations ≤ 27 days, solar soft X-rays show similar or higher correlations with the ionosphere electron densities than the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV). The correlations between solar irradiances and foF2 decrease from morning (0.5) to the afternoon (0.1). (3) Geomagnetic activity plays an important role in the ionosphere in short-term variations ≤ 10 days. The average correlation between TEC and Dst is 0.4 at 2-3, 3-5, 5-9 and 9-11 day scales, which is higher than those between foF2 and Dst. The correlations between TEC and Dst increase from morning to afternoon. The moderate/quiet geomagnetic activity plays a distinct role in these short-term variations of the ionosphere (~0.3 correlation).

Notes

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Graduation Date

2007

Semester

Spring

Advisor

Eastes, Richard

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Engineering and Computer Science

Department

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Degree Program

Electrical Engineering

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0001602

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0001602

Language

English

Release Date

May 2007

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until May 2007; it will then be open access.

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