Keywords

vicarious trauma, domestic violence, trauma, compassion fatigue

Abstract

Working within the field of domestic violence can result in the occurrence of vicarious traumatization. The literature supports that collegial support and supervision are effective tools organizations can implement to assist in minimizing vicarious trauma. This study, guided by constructive self development theory and feminist theory, examines whether the level of vicarious trauma is impacted by knowledge base, collegial support, and supervision. Staff within certified shelters in the state of Florida were surveyed using a research designed instrument and the Trauma and Attachment Belief Scale. A total of 112 participants were recruited using the Tailor Design Method of surveying. Findings indicate that uniquely none of the independent variables significantly impacted vicarious trauma symptoms. However, collectively knowledge base, collegial support and supervision did impact minimizing vicarious trauma. Further, five of the ten subscales of vicarious trauma showed a statistically significant relationship with the independent variables. Implications for domestic violence agencies, practitioners, and future research are drawn.

Notes

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Graduation Date

2008

Advisor

Abel, Eileen

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

College

College of Health and Public Affairs

Degree Program

Public Affairs

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

CFE0002098

URL

http://purl.fcla.edu/fcla/etd/CFE0002098

Language

English

Release Date

April 2009

Length of Campus-only Access

None

Access Status

Doctoral Dissertation (Open Access)

Restricted to the UCF community until April 2009; it will then be open access.

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